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Anonymous’ Commander X Claims Access to Every Classified Database in the US Government

“It’s a matter of when we leak the contents of those databases, not if. You know how we got access? We didn’t hack them. The access was given to us by the people who run the systems. The five-star general (and) the Secretary of Defence who sit in the cushy plush offices at the top of the Pentagon don’t run anything anymore”, said Cristopher Doyon, a.k.a Commander X, in an exclusive interview for National Post.  He hints at true underground cooperation between second rank government officials who allegedly hand “the keys to the kingdom” to the movement.

Doyon’s latest exploit is a DDoS attack on the city of Santa Cruz’s web servers back in September 2011, a “digital sit it”, as his lawyer, Jay Leiderman called it, which might cost the underground attacker 15 years in jail. Doyon took refuge to Canada in February 2012.

When questioned on the general view that the Anons are nothing more than cyber-terrorists, Doyon enters a semantic debate aiming to clearly identify who is actually terrified by hacktivists’ actions: “If it’s the bad guys who are terrified, I’m really super OK with that. If it’s the average person, the people out in the world we are trying to help who are scared of us, I’d ask them to educate themselves, to do some research on what it is we do and lose that fear. We’re fighting for the people, we are fighting, as Occupy likes to say, for the 99%. It’s the 1% people who are wrecking our planet who should be quite terrified”.

Last Friday, Anonymous claimed responsibility for temporarily K.O.-ing the kremlin.ru web site as a sign of protest against the re-election of Vladimir Putin.

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About the author

Ioana Jelea

Ioana Jelea has a disturbing (according to friendly reports) penchant for the dirty tricks of online socialization and for the pathologically mesmerizing news trivia. From gory, though sometimes fake, death reports to nip slips and other such blush-inducing accidents, her repertoire is an ever-expanding manifesto against any Victorian-like frame of thought that puts a strain on online creativity. She would like to keep things simple, but she never does.