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Dyre Banking Trojan Still Phishing for Data, US-CERT Warns

A new phishing campaign employs the Dyre banking Trojan to steal account credentials from enterprises and financial institutions, according to an alert by the Department of Homeland Security.

In the advisory, US-CERT said the phishing campaign uses various tactics, but mostly malicious PDF email attachments to download malware.

“Phishing emails used in this campaign often contain a weaponized PDF attachment which attempts to exploit vulnerabilities found in unpatched versions of Adobe Reader,” the alert reads.

The Dyre banking malware, also known as Dyreza, targets sensitive account credentials. Once downloaded and installed, the malware copies itself under C:\\Windows\[RandomName].exe and disguises itself as a fake program named Google Update Service to capture user login information and send the data back to the attackers.

For instance, a phishing email’s subject reads “Unpaid invoce” and invited the user to download the alleged unpaid invoice, coming with the email.

US-CERT said the campaign started in mid-October, and it’s not the first time Dyre banking malware is involved in a malicious campaign.

In early September, cloud-based CRM Salesforce issued a security warning to its millions of business users about the malware, as it attempted to steal login credentials from Salesforce customers.

Bitdefender blocks this threat and advises users to keep their anti-malware solution updated and take caution when opening unrequested email attachments.

About the author

Alexandra GHEORGHE

Alexandra started writing about IT at the dawn of the decade - when an iPad was an eye-injury patch, we were minus Google+ and we all had Jobs. She has since wielded her background in PR and marketing communications to translate binary code to colorful stories that have been known to wear out readers' mouse scrolls. Alexandra is also a social media enthusiast who 'likes' only what she likes and LOLs only when she laughs out loud.

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