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Facebook Clarifies Community Standards Regarding Terrorism, Nudity, Sex and Violence

Facebook Photo Syncing Raises Privacy Concerns

Facebook Photo Syncing Raises Privacy ConcernsFacebook has updated its Community Standards page to provide further explanations on the type of content not permitted on the social network.

The company often removes content that has been reported for one reason or another. But what’s acceptable, and what’s not? Since the audience is made up of a diverse global community, maintaining a set of standards to fit all needs is challenging. So, Facebook detailed its existing policies and took the chance to clarify its controversial real name policy.

The social network said users did not have to sign up with their legal name, and could indeed use what Facebook terms their “authentic identity” — the name they choose to go by.

“We remove content, disable accounts, and work with law enforcement when we believe there is a genuine risk of physical harm or direct threats to public safety,” Facebook said on its Community Standards page.

Promoting self-injury, suicide, “dangerous” organizations engaged in terrorist or criminal activity, bullying and harassment and attacks on public figures are a few situations where Facebook restricts content. Images or videos about sexual exploitation, selling drugs or adult products, and examples of hate speech are also prohibited.

The new document includes a section entitled ‘Encouraging respectful behavior’ where Facebook lays out its policies relating to nudity, sex and violence. Facebook may ban artistic projects depicting nudity “because some audiences within our global community may be sensitive to this type of content – particularly because of their cultural background or age.”

Restrictions on the display of both nudity and sexual activity also apply to digitally created content unless the content is posted for educational, humorous, or satirical purposes,” it adds.

The company also said it continues to see an increase in government requests for data removal.

“The amount of content restricted for violating local law increased by 11% over the previous half, to 9,707 pieces of content restricted, up from 8,774. We saw a rise in content restriction requests from countries like Turkey and Russia, and declines in places like Pakistan,” Facebook said in a post.

About the author

Alexandra GHEORGHE

Alexandra started writing about IT at the dawn of the decade - when an iPad was an eye-injury patch, we were minus Google+ and we all had Jobs. She has since wielded her background in PR and marketing communications to translate binary code to colorful stories that have been known to wear out readers' mouse scrolls. Alexandra is also a social media enthusiast who 'likes' only what she likes and LOLs only when she laughs out loud.

2 Comments

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  • System is flawed.
    1) Too many profiles with fake names (fake first name, fake middle name, fake surname)

    2) People have multiple profiles which breach TOS but still they exist.

  • Hi –
    I certainly understand the need to maintain a respectful standard for depictions of the human body. Otherwise, Facebook would soon be potholed with a vast collection of vulgar fetish and pornographic pages.

    I am a sculptor, and occasionally post photos of my work, which being sculpture, doesn’t draw any complaints. However,
    I propose that you seriously revisit your policy for photos of nude humans. I realize that the degree of subjectivity with which each of us judges levels of acceptance, makes this a difficult area, but when an image is clearly historic, then it is art and should be as acceptable as a painting or sculpture.

    Recently, I shared an article that a friend had posted about “Taylor Camp” a 1960’s era Hippie tree house community on a beach in Hawaii. There were a number of nude black & white images in the article. None of them salacious. Some friend of a friend reported it to you and it was removed. The article and images are art and history, and should be respected as such.

    Best regards,
    Gary Kilgore