Industry News

Houseparty app boycotted after users claim their online accounts were hacked

As the number of coronavirus infections continues to rise, we are becoming more dependent on video chat apps to connect with family, friends and coworkers.

There’s never been a better time for face-to-face social networks to shine, and the Houseparty app has become a sensation in the digital world these past weeks. Houseparty is one of a number of apps that allow family and friends to get together and make video calls, play games or just relax while watching their favorite show.

However, starting on Monday, many app users claimed their online accounts, including Spotify, Paypal, Instagram, Snapchat, Netflix, PayPal, have been compromised. The elephant in the room is none other than the popular video chat app.

As news of the alleged data breach continues to spread, many users have joined the online riot and advise any Houseparty aficionados to immediately delete the app from their devices.

One user said: “DELETE HOUSEPARTY! My PayPal which was with the same email address has been hacked and money taken from my bank!”

“Delete house party – somebody has hacked my Spotify from it,” one user wrote.

“PSA everyone delete ur houseparty account as they have hacked my Spotify and Netflix from POLAND and the US,” added another.

The creators of the app, quickly responded to the accusations and denied any data breach, claiming that the rumors are part of an elaborate smear campaign. The company went so far as to offer a $1 million check to the person who can provide any evidence of such an attempt.

“We are investigating indications that the recent hacking rumors were spread by a paid commercial smear campaign to harm Houseparty. We are offering a $1,000,000 bounty for the first individual to provide proof of such a campaign to bounty@houseparty.com,” said the company in a recent tweet.

The developers continue to support their users and provide further reassuring messages: “All Houseparty accounts are safe – the service is secure, has never been compromised, and doesn’t collect passwords for other sites.”

Video conferencing apps are known to have been exploited by cyber criminals in the past, and the supposed data breach is not to be taken lightly. Internet users often use the same password for more than one online account, and it is recommended that any affected parties start changing passwords for all of their online accounts to avoid any further damages.

About the author

Alina Bizga

Alina has been a part of the Bitdefender family for some years now, as her past role involved interfacing with end users and partners, advocating Bitdefender technologies and solutions. She is a history buff and passionate about cybersecurity and anything sci-fi. Her spare time is usually split between her two feline friends and traveling.