SPAM REVIEW

The Spam Omelette #17

Welcome to the seventeenth issue of our Spam Omelette, a weekly report on the latest trends in spam. If you missed our previous spam reports, you may want to check it out now to get acquainted with our testing methodology and spam map generation procedures.

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;}

Week in review: March 4-11

Spam Map 17

1. EMAIL listed as number one for six weeks

The undisputed
leader in the spam world, the word EMAIL managed to score a six-week record as
the top term used in unsolicited messages. The BitDefender spam researchers
identified the term in two spam campaigns, namely a batch of messages sent by
Canadian Pharmacy, as well as a smaller campaign in the Nigerian scam family.

The first series of
messages started showing up on March 7 and spammers seem to have been extremely
active since then. More than that,
these unsolicited messages feature generic subjects meant to trick the user
into opening the message. On a side note, the message always displays the
sender’s address to be identical to the recipient’s one

Email spam

The second spam
wave featuring the word EMAIL is a simple Nigerian scam with a taste of social
engineering. The message allegedly announces the recipient that they are
required to pick a bank draft, but they would have to provide the scammer with
some

About the author

Bogdan BOTEZATU

Bogdan Botezatu is living his second childhood at Bitdefender as senior e-threat analyst. When he is not documenting sophisticated strains of malware or writing removal tools, he teaches extreme sports such as surfing the web without protection or rodeo with wild Trojan horses. He believes that most things in life can be beat with strong heuristics and that antimalware research is like working for a secret agency: you need to stay focused at all times, but you get all the glory when you catch the bad guys.