MISCELLANEOUS

Twitter

Social networking bubble (eventually) bursting out

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When TwitterTM went down in a DDoS attack yesterday,
some users of the social networking platforms felt like “terrorists
were attacking
“; others complained about the heavy productivity
loss
and inability
to complete their jobs
.

Allegations and rumors put the blame on the creepy Koobface worm.
Conspiracy theorists pointed the finger towards a cyberfare offensive meant to silent the voice
of a blogger
that supports Republic
of Georgia.

To spice things a little, a few days ago, the US Department
of Defense announced that it seriously consider
moving away from Web 2.0
, while the US Marines completely
rejected social networking
, and, of course, Twitter.

Until the situation clears a little bit, the lesson of the social
networking bubble that naturally burst yesterday taught the world several
things: the inevitable occurred – it was just a matter of time until Twitter,
Facebook and others to be hit (very hard). The social networking addiction (“dependence”,
if we talk about businesses) rockets towards sky – just take
a look at how hard the Internet traffic fell
during Twitter outage.

Hopefully, people will start to realize that Web 2.0
solutions need to be more secure. With a bit of luck, the consequence will be
visible soon enough – robust and safe social networking hubs.

Last but not least, the world spent several hours away from
Blackberry and computer keyboards, using neurons for something else than
advertising 140-characters-long messages about “watching tv”, “drinking beer”
and so on… Again, hopefully…

About the author

Răzvan LIVINTZ

With a humanities passion and background (BA and MA in Comparative Literature at the Faculty of Letters, University of Bucharest) - complemented by an avid interest for the IT world and its stunning evolution, I joined in the autumn of 2003 the chief editors' team from Niculescu Publishing House, as IT&C Chief Editor, where (among many other things) I coordinated the Romanian version of the well-known SAMS Teach Yourself in 24 Hours series. In 2005 I accepted two new challenges and became Junior Lecturer at the Faculty of Letters (to quote U2 - "A Sort of Homecoming") and Lead Technical Writer at BluePhoenix Solutions.

After leaving from BluePhoenix in 2008, I rediscovered "all that technical jazz" with the E-Threat Analysis and Communication Team at BitDefender, the creator of one of the industry's fastest and most effective lines of internationally certified security software. Here I produce a wide range of IT&C security-related content, from malware, spam and phishing alerts to technical whitepapers and press releases. Every now and then, I enjoy scrutinizing the convolutions of e-criminals' "not-so-beautiful mind" and, in counterpart, the new defensive trends throughout posts on www.hotforsecurity.com.

Balancing the keen and until late in night (please read "early morning") reading (fiction and comparative literature studies mostly) with Internet "addiction", the genuine zeal for my bright and fervid students with the craze for the latest discoveries in science and technology, I also enjoy taking not very usual pictures (I'm not a pro, but if you want to see the world through my lenses, here are some samples http://martzipan.blogspot.com), messing around with DTP programs to put out some nifty book layouts and wacky t-shirts, roaming the world (I can hardly wait to come back in the Big Apple), and last but not least, driving my small Korean car throughout the intricacies of our metropolis's traffic.